You just bought an RDX, and you love the feeling it gives when the engine pushes you back in the seat. What are the Acura RDX 0-60 and quarter-mile times?

It’s not that you plan to take the RDX out to the track or race from the highway patrol flashing its lights behind you, but there are times when speed is needed. Will the RDX’s engine fail to deliver when you go to pass a long line of semis? Will the car have enough acceleration for your wife’s lead foot? What kind of horsepower does it produce, and does the turbocharged engine make that much difference? If you are going to be able to justify buying a non-American crossover for your true blood flag-waving father-in-law, you’d better have done your homework.

The 2022 Acura RDX has an inline four-cylinder engine that produces 278 hp @ 6000 rpm and 280 lb-ft of torque @ 1600 rpm. The car reaches 60 mph from a standstill in 6.4 seconds and can run a quarter-mile in 14.3 seconds. These times are similar for all model years (2007 - present).

For a premium crossover, those running times are not shabby. While there has been very little change in the design of the Acura RDX’s engine over the years, the engineers have made some minor adjustments. There is some fine-tuning to the engine every year to help keep the engine cooler and increased fuel economy. The Acura continues to be a very reliable engine.

But still, that will not be enough to convince good ole’ Dad. Let’s look at some 0-60 mph times and compare them to some of the other crossovers. Maybe then you can take your father-in-law out for a drive, have him experience the pickup of the engine, and smile at you. If that happened, it would be worth seeing the grumpy old man do something other than frown all the time.

Acura RDX: 0-60 & Quarter Mile Times

TABLE OF CONTENTS

HideShow

What Are The 0-60 MPH and Quarter Mile Times?

There isn’t much of a variance between the model years for these times, as illustrated by the table below - statistics found at mycarspecs.com.

Model Year / Engine 0-60 Mph Quarter Mile Time Source
2007 - 2.3L - I 4 7.1 seconds 14.0 seconds mycarspecs.com
2008 - 2.3L - I 4 7.6 seconds 14.0 seconds mycarspecs.com
2009 - 2.3L - I 4 7.6 seconds 14.0 seconds mycarspecs.com
2010 - 2.3L - I 4 7.6 seconds 14.0 seconds mycarspecs.com
2011 - 2.3L - I 4 7.6 seconds 14.0 seconds mycarspecs.com
2012 -2.3L - I 4 7.6 seconds 14.0 seconds mycarspecs.com
2013 - 3.5 V6 6.8 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2014 - 3.54L V6 6.8 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2015 - 3.5L V6 6.8 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2016 - 3.5L V6 6.8 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2017 - 3.5L V6 6.8 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2018 - 3.5L V6 6.8 seconds 13.3 seconds mycarspecs.com
2019 - 2.0L I 4 6.9 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2020 2.0L I 4 6.9 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2021 2.0L I 4 6.9 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com
2022 2.0 L I 4 6.9 seconds 13.4 seconds mycarspecs.com

What are the 0 - 60 mph and Quarter Mile Stats of Other Models?

The 2022 Acura RDX has a very stout time for a crossover SUV, clocking times equal to or better than many higher-priced competitors.

Make / Model 0-60 mph Quarter Mile Time
Porsche Macan 5.1 seconds 13.5 seconds
Audi Q5 5.9 seconds 14.5 seconds
Mercedes GLC 5.9 seconds 14.7 seconds
Cadillac SRX 6.2 seconds 14.7 seconds
Lincoln MKX 6.5 seconds 14.5 seconds
Cadillac XT5 6.5 seconds N/A
Lexus RX 6.9 seconds 15.3 seconds
Ford Escape Titanium 7.7 seconds 16.0 seconds
Ford Escape SE Ecoboost 6.8 seconds 15.9 seconds
Hyundai Tucson SE 8.7 seconds 16.3 seconds
Kia Sportage LX 8.7 seconds 16.3 seconds

How Are 0- 60 mph Times Calculated?

The car is placed on a track and timed going in opposite directions so that certain variables such as wind and driver performance can be canceled out. The times are averaged and listed as the accepted 0-60 mph time.

What Are Some Factors that Affect 0-60 mph Ratings?

Several factors can affect 0-60 times for any car, not just an Acura RDX. Let’s look at a few of them.

Aerodynamics of the Vehicle

Now, as you might expect, the sleeker a car is, the less wind resistance is created. The experts measure the coefficient of drag, which is just a fancy term for how much wind drag the car has. Many designers are experimenting with ways to create a less wind-resistant vehicle with air intakes, aero curtains, and sloping lines, all designed to channel the way air flows around and through a vehicle.

Weight

But wind resistance is just one of many components. Weight also plays a factor. The heavier a car, the more power it will take to move the mass. Since its inception in 2007, the weight for the RDX has stayed near 4,000 lbs, which is why you don’t see too much variance in the 0-60 times.

Power to Weight Ratio

The 0-60 mph times aren’t just a matter of figuring wind resistance and weight. There is also  the power of a vehicle to consider. The lower the power-to-weight ratio is, the faster the car will scoot down the track. The size of the engine and the power output it produces will affect the times, which is why engineers focus on things like horsepower and pound per foot of torque. Since it takes a certain amount of power to push the mass of a vehicle forward, this is why the power-to-weight ratios are essential. Many of Acura’s competitors have V6 engines, which deliver more power, and that’s why some of them clock faster times.

Tires

The vehicle has to be able to deliver the power from the engine to the tires. Tires that have higher traction or make more contact with the road surface will be able to grip the pavement better. The increased traction can result in shaving tenths of a second off the clock, which won’t mean much on the Interstate, but it matters to engineers.

Weather on the Day of the Run

It might not make much difference, but weather can play a crucial role 0-60 times. Tires have a more challenging time getting a grip on wet pavement than dry, and the colder the temperature, the more power is needed to move the mass. (Remember your high school physics class?)

Driver Variables

Even though testing companies try to account for the subtle differences in driver performance, they can’t factor out all. The driver might hesitate when he stomps his foot down on the gas on the run when he didn’t in the first race. He might wiggle the steering wheel as the car lurches forward, which also costs time.

Suspension/Transmission

How heavy the suspension is can affect 0-60 times, as can the type of transmission present. Automatic transmissions have shorter gears at low speeds than the manuals, so they tend to clock at faster speeds.

What Effect Will the New Hybrid Engine Have?

New for 2023, Acura is unveiling a hybrid engine for the RDX. The engine complex is the same 2.0 L that is currently powering the Honda Accord. If the stats for the Accord are close, it means 212 horsepower with 6.7 seconds for 0-60 mph and a quarter-mile time of 15.4 seconds. This hearty engine will be enough for the average daily driver and save them some money at the pump.

What are the Safety Ratings for Acura RDX?

The 2022 Acura RDX has a 5-star safety crash rating from the NHTSA, the highest rating it gives. The IIHS rating for the vehicle is right in line with a “G” (Good) rating. IIHS lists the RDX as one of its Top Safety Picks. In addition, IIHS tested the Forward Collision-Avoidance system for this vehicle, and both performed exceptionally well, avoiding collisions at 12 mph and 25 mph.

Over the years, the RDX has had one of the lowest mortality rates of any SUV. The IIHS estimates that the RDX has averaged a four per one million death rate, compared to 34 per million in the average car or SUV.

Why is this important? Well, you’ll pay less insurance for a safer car than one that isn’t. And then there is your family to consider. They are more likely to survive a horrific crash in an RDX than something less safe like a Honda HRV, which earned a less than good rating from IIHS for the 2022 model year.

About THE AUTHOR

Charles Redding

Charles Redding

I've spent many years selling cars, working with auto detailers, mechanics, dealership service teams, quoting and researching car insurance, modding my own cars, and much more.

Read More About Charles Redding